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In the last part of my Taiwan diary it’s all about funny random facts. Taiwanese are really nice and fun people, but they have some strange characteristics that made me laugh quite a few times. Of course I had to share this with you. Also make sure you watch my video where I share some impression from my trip.
 
In the first part it’s all about my favorite places & memories from Taiwan
In the second part I give you some tips and hard facts for your own trip to Taiwan.

The Toilet Obsession

Klo Anzeige in Taiwan | lustige Fakten | öffentliche Toiletten | intelligente, modernes WC

The Taiwanese appear to have a veritable obsession with the loo – in the best sense, though! Nowhere else in the world did I find such easy access to toilets. They are everywhere, and they are clean!!
 
Yes, that includes those in public places, metro stations and even gas stations. That alone is surprising enough. Even more surprising was that, say, in the metro stops, there are maps on display above the toilet signs, which marked exactly which kind of toilet was in which cabin (with seat or without), and which also indicated with red and green lights whether a specific cabin was occupied or not. Isn’t that totally awesome? What’s more, I never saw so many ‘intelligent’ hi-tech toilets anywhere else in the world. Most toilets in hotels and restaurants have heated toilet seats and tons of extra functions. I’m not kidding, this country is toilet paradise!

Klo Anzeige in einer öffentlichen Toilette in Taiwan

Hello Kitty Staubsauger in Taiwan

A Love for all things Hello Kitty
Apart from an apparent deep love for their toilets, the Taiwanese also seem to be collectively obsessed with Hello Kitty! The cat and her friends are simply EVERYWHERE! Barely a restaurant, place, street or airport that doesn’t feature the feline cartoon one way or another. It was duly explained to me that Hello Kitty won the hearts of old and young Taiwanese by storm. It’s completely crazy!

Van mit Katzen Motiv

Flughafen in Taiwan mit Hello Kitty Deko | Gate C3

theme parties
everywhere

Generally speaking, it seems like the Taiwanese have a soft spot for themes, and they implement them on all scales.
 
It starts with theme rooms, theme restaurants, theme hotels, waiting areas at airports with theme designs, even entire villages that are modeled around certain concepts. I’m not sure which one I found to be the most loco: maybe the gigantic Hello Kitty waiting area at the airport for those who are lucky (or unfortunate) enough to embark at gate C3, and who have the opportunity (or are condemned) to wait in pink paradise (or hell)?
Or how about cat village, which has essentially been taken over by cats, which in turn became the theme of the place and are everywhere from souvenirs, roos, cobblestones, music, cakes and even the train station? Honorable mention goes to the toilet restaurant, where all visitors sit on toilet seats and have their food served to them in toilet bowls? Just another day in Taiwan.

The largest art collection
China and Taiwan are close neighbors with an intricately linked history and plenty of cultural cross references. Taiwan always tended to be under the thumb of either China or Japan. During the second world war, Taiwan segregated from mainland China. The communists won the civil war in China, started to burn books and embarked on a witch hunt for intellectuals, many of which fled to Taiwan and hid innumerable treasures from their old home on the island. These items would have otherwise been destroyed.
 
One of the refugees was the politician Chiang Kai-Shek, who brought a large part of the imperial art collection with him. The collection includes a huge amount of ancient scrolls and invaluable treasures from the ‘forbidden town’. For these reasons, the national palace museum is in Taiwan and not in China. The collection is built into a mountain and comprises the largest accumulation of Chinese art (almost 700.000 objects) spanning 8000 years of history.

Traditional Characters

Talking about tradition…
 
there are two ways to write Chinese characters: one is simplified, one is, well, let’s say elaborate. The more complicated script used to be the standard. Old books and manuscripts were written in that script, but with the introduction of the simplified characters knowledge of the traditional way of writing and reading faded into obscurity. In China, that is. Not in Taiwan. Here (and in Hong Kong), the old script lives. The advantage is that with knowledge of the old characters you can read texts both in old and new script. The Taiwanese are very proud of this skill, but they are also worried that they may lose it with the advance of globalization.

7-Eleven for everything (literally!)
7Eleven (every Taiwanese convenience store, actually) is sort of an all-in one supermarket in Taiwan.
 
If you envision a little kiosk or what we call Späti’s in Berlin, you’re completely on the wrong track! A Taiwanese 7Eleven has much more to offer than 24h opening: you can print, it serves as a bank, laundromat and internet café, and if that’s not enough you can also pay our taxes there. No joke! We had a guide with us who told us these things, and at first I couldn’t believe it! But once you see one of those 7Elevens form the inside, you kind of start accepting it. These stores are veritable hubs of activity, and the first stop for a long list of errands. For us they were mostly useful because we could buy sweets whenever we wanted!

Tea in Taiwan
It’s pretty much impossible to find genuinely good coffee, but you get the best tea ever at every street corner! This is in part due to the fact that the Taiwanese grow tea in their own country, especially Oolong Tea, which grows only in China and Taiwan. But the tea leaves themselves are only part of the story, it all boils down (quite literally) to how they are brewed and seeped. For the average Taiwanese, tea is a major part of their culture. Many people have elaborate rituals for brewing their perfect cup of tea. Looks a bit like shell game, the whole affair: tea is poured from one cup to the other until it is perfect. The good stuff is available in the ubiquitous tea houses, in which prices tend to be very cheap, on top of it.
 
Not only the quality is excellent, the variety on offer is outstanding. Apart from classic tea varieties, the Taiwanese have explored pretty much every conceivable variation of the concept of tea – it is sold in tetra packs in the supermarket (super tasty), and then there’s of course bubble tea. This drink is truly the life blood of the island!

Bye, Bye GPS!
We were creeped out to see that our watches and mobile phones malfunctioned in the mountains. Pictures we took with the camera had this weird visual noise, our routes were tracked incorrectly by our GPS, and, well, it seems like all technical appliances didn’t really seem to work as they should. It felt a bit spooky, as if a supernatural power was at work. We were then told that the phenomena are apparently due to magnetism along the east coast (unfortunately I didn’t find any more information on the subject on Google). The phenomenon is a mystery, and it seems like it draws a constant stream of scientists to the area. Something seems to be a little off there, but no one really knows what’s going on… and maybe it will remain a mystical secret for all times.

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This post is also available in German Russian

Somewhere between nature &
technology

Few peoples manage to create such a healthy balance between technology and nature as the Taiwanese (which are in stark contrast to their neighbors in that respect). On the one hand, Taiwan is an export economy, known for products like crayons, umbrellas, socks and so much more, on the other hand the people feel strongly connected to nature and do their best to protect their mountains and waters. To give just one example, a large part of the Taiwanese mountains consists of marble, but the people refuse to quarry it in order to protect the landscape. Recycling is part of the social fabric, and there are very few bins on the streets for that reason. You usually need to take your trash with you and do the right thing when the garbage collection trucks come to your place and honk their funny horns. Generally speaking, Taiwan is a very ‘green’ place, and that despite the fact the they seem to be ten years in the future when it comes to technology (the high-speed internet alone deserves an honorable mention. Worked super well even in the middle of nowhere). Not many countries manage to uphold this delicate balance, and it didn’t fall into the laps of the Taiwanese either – they worked hard for it. Definitely an area where we can learn a lot from Taiwan!

Athletic Elders
I’ve never been anywhere with so many active elders. On the streets, in the mountains, in parks – the older generations are super active in Taiwan, and live their lives in big groups of friends, for example in the parks, in pursuit of one of their favorite activities: Tai Chi.
 
Tai Chi is kind of a national pastime. It was originally conceived as a martial art, but today’s variation centers exclusively on elasticity, stretching and meditation. I must confess that I saw many pensioners who were obviously much more sporty than me (and I still hear their giggles as they saw me trying to keep up with them and failing miserably). Sports are a genuine group activity for older people in Taiwan, not unlike board games in Europe. You know how the saying goes: a healthy spirit in a healthy body!

This post is also available in German Russian

.Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

It’s been a whole since I posted my last hotel review, which is partly due to the fact that it’s been ages since I pitched my figurative tent in any place for more than a day or two. Usually I get restless after two nights max, but in the case of the W in Taipei I stayed a full 5 nights. It was an excellent decision. From my experience, the W hotel is always a good choice. While it is not necessarily the cheapest hotel you will find, you really get your money’s worth, and can rest assured that you are staying in a place that is really rooted in its respective city.
 
For example, the hotel publishes a W Insider, sort of a city guide, full with recommendations for pretty much anything you may be looking for. It’s a bit like having a good friend in town that shows you around. One aspect I really love about the W chain is that every hotel is different and interprets the vibe of the country and city it is located in, which is also reflected in things like the interior design.

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

I loved the theme of W Taipei, even though – or mabe precisely because – it was less obvious than in other branches: The symbiosis of Nature and Technology. A fitting theme for Taiwan, and something I came to observe frequently: the Taiwanese are very much in touch with nature, and go to great lengths to recycle their trash. At the same time, the society is super modern, and geared towards production and export.
 
The W unified these poles in its theme in a great way: a lot of the hotel’s furniture is made form recycled plastic. But the theme is also expressed in more subtle ways throughout the entire place, be it in glass-rimmed circles which symbolize water-drops and lead the way to the pool or bamboo fittings, which are typical for Taiwan. Visitors that keep their eyes open will find endless creative references to the country. A very nice touch!

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

The Location:
 
The W Taipei is located in the center of town, right in the heart of the shopping district, close to several major sights including Taipei 101, the second highest building in the world. Since the hotel itself is also a skyscraper, you get an unobstructed view on Taipei 101, which is very impressive indeed. On top of the great view, guests benefit from the proximity of endless shopping destinations. And in case you would like to venture into a different part of town, there’s a metro stop in the actual hotel building. On the whole, the location is top and I couldn’t think of a way to improve it.

Taipei 101

The rooms:

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

As I came to expect from W, the rooms are stylishly and carefully designed, very clean. Each room is designed differently, with one shared aspect: a great view on the Taipei skyline. Waking up in the morning to the sight of the city through a massive panorama window feels incredible, so much so that I really find myself missing it. The over-arching hotel theme cascades through each of the rooms. Recycled jewelry shelves, decorative animals and lots of wood, all in stylish interplay. Most importantly, the beds are extremely comfortable. So comfy, in fact, that we slept in almost every day. We just couldn’t motivate ourselves to get out of our warm beds in the mornings.

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

The Hotel:
 
The hotel includes a total of 5 bars and restaurants, among them the Yen Chinese restaurant, which has the reputation of being one of the best in town. The restuarant offers a modern interpretation of traditional Chinese cuisine, with a huge menu and some decidedly exotic dishes on offer. How about pig ear snacks, for example? Of course the menu also includes more ‘regular’ dishes like dumplings. Another highlight for me was the luxury gym. It is huge, perfectly equipped and with a 360° view on Taipei. They even had a punching bag.
On top of all that, the W regularly hosts events as diverse as a ‘farmer’s market’, in which local specialties are on offer, to tea parties with special themes. The only thing the hotel does not provide is boredom, the creative team makes sure of that!

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This post is also available in German Russian

Hotel Review, W Taipei, Taiwan, Masha Sedgwick, Blogger, Germany, Berlin, Where to sleep in Taiwan

The Bottom Line:
 
The W is not a budget chain, but for good reason. The hotel is an excellent choice, especially if you like to stay in a place with an decidedly individual touch somewhere between local culture and luxury standards. As I mentioned, the location is second to none, which makes discovering the city a breeze, with the added bonus of incredible views. The combination of these factors make for an outstanding experience in the very special city that is Taipei.

In collaboration with W Taipei

This post is also available in German Russian

.Taiwan, Taipei, sightseeing, Palace, national museum

Gold is not the most precious, happiness is worth much more
chinese proverb

It took ages, but I finally managed to type up the second part of my Taiwan post. In the first part I introduced some special places to you and told you about precious moments I spent on the island. I shared some experiences with you and told you what amazed me about the place. I also included some personal recommendations of places and activities you shouldn’t miss if you ever get the chance to go.
 
And today I will complement this personal angle with some hard facts to prepare you for a trip to the island.

Taiwan

Getting there
We flew with Eva Air, one of the most awarded airlines in the world, with a direct connection from Paris. The flight took about 13-14 hours from Paris, which is long, but in the end passes relatively quickly, especially considering that Taiwan is literally on the other end of the globe from a European perspective, past India and China. Eva Air is the main domestic airline in Taiwan, and member of the Star Alliance group (of which Lufthansa is also a member). The company is one of the very few airlines awarded 5-stars by SKYTRAX (which makes it one of only nine airlines in the world, none of which are from Europe). Moreover, the airline ranks 6th in the global JADEC security ranking, which contributes further to its popularity in the entire Asian region. The only European destinations the airline serves are Vienna, Paris, London and Amsterdam, but there are connecting flights from Germany via Lufthansa, Germanwings, Air Berlin, Austrian Airlines, KLM and, alternatively, Rail & Fly, which covers the entire German rail network and extends up to Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam. We flew economy class, and had a genuinely good experience, not least due to the fact that we had a bit more legroom than you would expect in economy. The time on board went by pretty quickly, the whole flight was easy and painless.
 
Random Fact: Due to the fact that the Taiwanese are crazy about all things Hello Kitty, the airport had a giant Hello Kitty Lounge. We even saw Hello Kitty planes (best link ever!)!! Unfortunately they tend to fly only between Taiwan and China, but I found consolation in the Hello Kitty menu in the airport restaurant, complete with Hello Kitty dessert. I can’t help it, I think that’s all really cute.

the perfect suitcase for hand luggage

Taiwan, Taroko

Taiwan | Taroko with the train

Infrastructure
Having arrived in Taiwan, you have several options for transport:
trains, metro and cars.
 
Taiwan has a well maintained network of train tracks and roads – perfect for a road trip! The major cities are linked by regular train lines as well as by a super modern high speed train. Which takes you from the the North of the island to the South in 90 minutes. For all cities and locations in between it makes more sense to take a regular train or a Taiwan Tour Bus. However, the most fun option, at least on the east coast, is driving along the marvelous coast by car, and then into the mountains. The east of the island is very mountainous, with a great number of national parks, which also means there are fewer public transport options, as there are generally fewer large towns and mostly little villages in the area.

The major cities are almost exclusively located on the west coast. It really makes a lot of sense to rent a car when heading east – I guarantee you will feel a string urge to stop and take in the beauty of your surroundings more than once. You can then easily drop off the car in Kaohsiung or Taichung and head on by train. In Taipei you certainly won’t need a car. The best way to get around in the capital is the metro, which will save you time, money and energy.
 
We were pleasantly surprised by how affordable public transportation is despite the high standards everywhere on the island.

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This post is also available in German Russian

Walking ten thousand miles of roads is better than reading ten thousand scrolls of books.
 
读万卷书,不如行万里路,行万里路不如阅览世人无数。

 
chinese proverb

W Hotel Taipei room with a view

Silk Palace Taroko national park in Taiwan, 5 stars hotel

Accommodation
Unfortunately we did not stay in private apartments, so I have no experiences to share with you in that respect. However, we did stay in several hotels. Just like with the public transport infrastructure, the standards for hotels, which tend to be rather westernized, are very high indeed – as are the prices! While the price level is not quite as high as, say, London, it is by no means lower than in Berlin. That said, we booked most of our accommodation when already in Taiwan, and found some rooms up to 70% cheaper than the prices we found when we researched the situation in Germany before our trip.
 
This is typical for Asian countries: accommodation prices for domestic travelers tend to be substantially lower. If you are not averse to a modicum of risk, I highly recommend booking your hotel only for the first night or two. You’ll get much better prices for the rest of your stay if you book spontaneously in Taiwan.

My top pick from the hotels we stayed at would definitely be the Silks Palace Hotel in Taroko National Park (unfortunately we stayed there only for one night). It was simply perfect: pool on the roof, incredible food, rooms with outstanding view on the mountainous landscape and the river and – nothing else, just nature. At night you can gaze at stars from the jacuzzi, watch a movie (in english) in the hotel’s own outdoor cinema, or just unwind in peace and quiet. This place was truly magical, and an ideal break for us on our road trip!
 
In Taipei we lodged at W Hotel, my favorite address when it comes to city trips, and essentially my favorite chain in general. Once again, I was not disappointed. With hindsight I feel we may have picked the best address in town, as the W is right in the heart of Taipei, with a breathtaking view over the city, which will feature in a separate blog post very soon.

traditional chinesische menu | W Taipei

Dumplings at Din Tai Fung | chinese kitchen | Taiwan, Taipei

supermarket in Taiwan, Taipei | different teas

Food
The Taiwanese kitchen is in many ways rather similar to the Chinese cuisine, which means plenty of dumplings (best address: Din Tai Fung) and rather heavy dishes (or, as my boyfriend calls it: ‘real food’). Generally speaking, the cuisine is more on the spicy, savory side, much less fruity than in Thailand, for example. Apart from dumplings, another very popular specialty is Mango Snow Ice, which is essentially kind of a giant sundae with mango ice cream, mango pieces, mango sauce and flaky yoghurt ice cream. Delicioussss! Another must-eat, or rather must-drink, is the famous bubble tea, which was invented in Taiwan. It tastes so much better in the country of its origin, incredible. Also, make sure to try some Taiwanese green tea! You will find plenty of tea houses, which specialize exclusively on tea ceremonies. If you happen to pass one of those (e.g. Jiufen), make sure to participate in a ceremony. I think you will find it’s really worth it!
 
A trip to the supermarket is an exciting adventure in Taiwan. The shelves are full with colorful sweets, exotic juices (asparagus juice, anyone) and a wide range of teas. I loved the local black tea with milk, in fact I really miss it now. Taiwan is located right between China and Japan, so there are many Japanese products available in Taiwan, which makes it all even more fun for western visitors. We encountered a lot of interesting, exciting and tasty food in this country, not only in restaurants but also on night markets like Shihlin. These markets offer delicacies for a bargain, from noodles in all shapes and forms and salade to loads of deep-fried dishes which most of the time I couldn’t even properly identify. My favorite were the sweet potato balls, and the plentiful fresh juices. Yummy!
 
Having said that, there were some local specialities that I could not warm to at all, namely stinking tofu and snake dishes. Plus, the Taiwanese seem to love food in pudding shape and consistency, somewhere between solid and liquid. That took a bit of getting used to, but I really got into it. If you’re up for trying exotic dishes and enjoy culinary adventures, look no further than Taiwan when planning your next trip.
 
By the way, vegetarians, rejoice! A large part of the Taiwanese population lives on a vegetarian diet, which is reflected in the wide range of veggie dishes and restaurants. In other word’s, it’s also a perfect for you if living meat-free is you thing!

Shopping
When it comes to shopping, you truly get your money’s worth here in Taiwan. You will want for nothing. Apart from some great bargains on the night markets, my highlight were the local Taiwanese designers, spearheaded by Jamei Chen, Shiatzy Chen, Loranzo, Douchanglee and Agaric Garden. Most of the interesting brands are available at Eslite Shopping Center, which was originally a 24h bookstore that has gradually turned into kind of a mall over time. The store supports local designers by offering a dedicated boot with designs made in Taiwan. If you are looking for a special souvenir or present, or if you simply love beautiful clothes, you’ll definitely find something special in the Eslite Center.
 
Talking about shopping, I also like the East District very much, the are surrounding the Zhongxiao Dunhua station. It is a great region to stroll around and to explore the many little shops like Ampm, NLF, and so many more. The area was a real highlight for me, I found some genuinely cool and unique labels and designs there, some of which I would not have dared to wear myself. I saw tons of great clothes with a 90s twist, and was struck by the wide range of destructivist clothing as well. Generally speaking, the dominant fashion on the streets is stylistically somewhere between COS and Urban Outfitters. But it does not stop with clothes. The Taiwanese have a huge affinity for make-up – especially Korean make-up! I could have spent my last cent on masks and make-up over there. Apart from the popular Korean brands, there are also a number of awesome Taiwanese brands like for example L’Herboflore and Sexylook, which specialize on treatments and masks. For me as a blogger, Taipei was a real highlight. I wish I’d have had more time (and money) to spend. There was so much to discover in this city. The whole trip would have been completely worth it for Taipei alone!

Taipei at night | Skyline view | Taiwan

Other
 
Health
Fortunately you don’t need any special vaccinations when traveling to Taiwan. That said, there are a lot of mosquitos on the island, so it makes a lot of sense to pack anti-mosquito sprays and the like. I’d also recommend to bring some back-up medicine for the stomach, nausea etc., in case you react to some of the more exotic food.
 
Language
In Taiwan, Chinese is the main spoken language. But there is a significant difference to mainland China: the Taiwanese use the ‘old’ Chinese script, of which Chinese use a simplified version these days. Download the Google translation app and activate the image function, and you’ll stand a much better chance of communication!
 
Internet
Internet is relatively cheap, but it doesn’t really make much sense to buy a Sim card as a tourist. At the airport you have the possibility to rent a small, portable router, and to charge it with a certain amount of bandwidth. Using this router you will be able to get online with multiple devices, in the hotel or on the go. And before you fly back home you simply return the thing at the airport. I can’t quite remember how much we paid for the service, but it really wasn’t all that expensive.
 
Crime
Fortunately, Taipei is one of the safes cities in the world. Crime rates are very low, and generally speaking there is no need to be overly worried when out on the streets at night.
 
Visa
As German, Austrian or Swiss citizen you need no visa for a stay of up to 30 days, but make sure that your passport is valid for at least another six months upon entering the country (this is mandatory). When entering the country, you need to fill out a questionnaire.
 
Tip
Giving tips is not a widespread custom in Taiwan, but when you leave some it is accepted gratefully. At any rate, it is never implied that you should leave a tip, as for example in the USA.
 
Weather
The best time to travel is between October and May. The southwest monsoon, associated with typhoons, starts in May and ends in late September, primarily affecting the south.
 
Find more information here: www.taiwantourismus.de

In collaboration with EVA AIR

This post is also available in German Russian

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The Author

Masha Sedgwick ist ein persönlicher Fashion und Style Blog aus Berlin. Neben Mode schreibt die Fashionbloggerin auch häufig über Themegebiete rund um Beauty, Lifestyle und Reisen und gibt wertvolle Tipps, ob zum perfekten Make up, der täglichen Haarpflege, dem besten Hotel oder für den schönsten Städtetrip überall auf der Welt. Der Blog existiert bereits seit 2010 und dank der anspruchsvollen Bilder und persönlichen Texten gehört Masha Sedgwick mittlerweile zu den erfolgreichsten und reichweitestärksten Modeblogs in Deutschland, hat es auch zu internationaler Bekanntheit erreicht und wird regelmäßig im Print und Fernsehen gefeatured.

Masha Sedgwick is a personal fashion and style blog from Berlin. Besides fashion she also writes about beauty, lifestyle and travel and gives valuable tips, whether it's the perfect makeup, daily hair care or the best hotel. Masha Sedgwick runs her blog since 2010 and thanks to its high quality in text and image the blog Masha Sedgwick is now one of the most successful fashion blogs in Germany.

Маша Седжвик – автор личного блога, посвященного моде и стилю. В центре ее внимания не только модная одежда – она часто пишет на темы, связанные с красотой, образом жизни и путешествиями, освещает модные тенденции, а также дает ценные советы – например, как сделать идеальный макияж, как правильно ухаживать за волосами, как выбрать отель или куда поехать в отпуск. Блог Маши Седжвик существует с 2010 года. Благодаря интересным текстам и качественным фотографиям он стал одним из самых успешных блогов о моде в Германии и постепенно приобретает популярность за ее пределами.

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