– In collaboration with Calida

underwear pictures in Hotel Zoo with Calida | Masha Sedgwick | sexy, naked, body | Berlin | hotel room with a view | classy

up: Calida BH, Top aus seidig weichem LENZING MicroModal® mit Viskose & Panties
Links: Calida Sweatshirt auch kuscheligem Frottee

underwear pictures in Hotel Zoo with Calida | Masha Sedgwick | sexy, naked, body | Berlin | hotel room with a view | classy

DDisclaimer: I must admit, I was not sure until the very last minute how many of the pics I shot for Calida I would actually be up for sharing online. You have seen the odd picture of me in a bra before, and at times I have shown quite a bit of skin, but this much? Is it really appropriate to show my whole body, dressed only in panties and a bra? The thought never crossed my mind during the shoot, but it gradually surfaced afterwards.
 
It’s strange, in a way. If it was a bikini, I’d never second guess it. I mean, I post pictures of myself in a bikini when I’m on holiday. But underwear?
While the amount of skin shown (and concealed) is exactly the same, this somehow feels like a different level, and I feel a different kind of inhibition.
 
In the back of my head I hear my mother, sighing:
‘Was that really necessary?’
 
To which my consciousness replies: ‘Well, she’s used to crazier stuff on my part’.
But honestly, is this a big thing because I blow it up, or does this go deeper?

underwear pictures in Hotel Zoo with Calida | Masha Sedgwick | sexy, naked, body | Berlin | hotel room with a view | classy

Where does this inhibition come from?

I do show my sexy side from time to time, but I wouldn’t consider my style primarily ‘sexy’ or ‘feminine’, at least those would not be the first attributes I would use. Sure, I enjoy the attention of men. But back in the day, in school, I was teased whenever I wore skirts and dresses (I was the ‘skirt girl’ then), which still makes me a bit insecure to the day.
 
Oh yeah, because all women who wear skirts or dresses that may not even cover the knee (good lord!) are of course whores, right? I was not even 14 years old and I was already up against these clichés. And I hadn’t even kissed a boy on the mouth yet. But only wearing trousers was no solution for me, either :)
 
So I stuck to my style, and my reputation stuck to me.
And that lead to the following reaction in me: I decided I was not ready to submit to convention if that meant I would have to betray my personal style. Yes, I was pretty stubborn, even back then.
I did indeed pursue my own ideas in style, and followed my own convictions, but I also became self-conscious in the process. Never again did I want to hear someone talk bad about me behind my back.
 
And what can I say? That didn’t work out, of course.

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This post is also available in German Russian

Location: Hotel Zoo Berlin
Photos: Theresa Kaindl

underwear pictures in Hotel Zoo with Calida | Masha Sedgwick | sexy, naked, body | Berlin | hotel room with a view | classy

underwear pictures in Hotel Zoo with Calida | Masha Sedgwick | sexy, naked, body | Berlin | hotel room with a view | classy

Today, more than 10 years later, it’s easy to laugh about these old stories, but at the same time I am conscious how influential those experiences were for the path I was about to take in life, for better or worse.
 
On the one hand, being singled out strengthened me, and I learned to stand up for myself and my own style, even if it goes against the grain. At the same time, I came out of it all with a certain inhibition to show too much skin, and I have to jump over my own shadow every time, as we say in German. It’s a genuine effort.
 
I do believe that it is up to every woman how much she wants to show of her body. And why not show a bit more from time to time? I have not felt so good in my skin for ages, and I would like to show that.

Why should underwear only be presented by models, after all?

Calida Shirt & Pants Set aus weichem Frottee

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This post is also available in German Russian

underwear pictures in Hotel Zoo with Calida | Masha Sedgwick | sexy, naked, body | Berlin | hotel room with a view | classy

Calida was founded in Switzerland in 1941, and has focused on the production of undergarments and nightwear. The company’s range also includes loungewear, shirts, knit-wear accessories as well as swim and beach wear. The products are of high quality and sustainably sourced, with uncluttered and timeless designs that are readily combinable. That’s what I appreciate so much about Calida: the pieces are soft, comfortable companions in every day life, and as flexible as I am.

Calida Soft Bra & Panties

underwear pictures in Hotel Zoo with Calida | Masha Sedgwick | sexy, naked, body | Berlin | hotel room with a view | classy

My body is nowhere nearly as flawless as that of a model, but I am healthy, and for the first time ever I am genuinely proud of myself. And I wanted to show that in this cooperation with Calida, a brand that stands for exactly that for me: feeling 100% well and at home in my skin.
 
That does not mean I have to be super skinny, I am not. Still, I enjoy seeing the muscles defining my body, a welcome confirmation that the hours I spent exercising over the past year were completely worth it. This is a personal success for me, and I want to share it with you.
 
And isn’t it nice to see a ‘real’ body from time to time, one without perfect curves, or, as in my case, one without many curves at all?
 
Plus, there’s nothing indecent about underwear per se. We all wear it. Every single day I’m wondering which outfit to wear, and naturally I’m also thinking about which underwear to pick. The material needs to feel soft and comfortable on the skin, without being too noticeable. And that’s exactly why Calida products are perfect for me.
 
How do you feel about it?
Blogger in underwear – yay or nay?

Who am I hurting?
Who could possibly be offended?

underwear pictures in Hotel Zoo with Calida | Masha Sedgwick | sexy, naked, body | Berlin | hotel room with a view | classy

underwear pictures in Hotel Zoo with Calida | Masha Sedgwick | sexy, naked, body | Berlin | hotel room with a view | classy

Calida Kimono aus sanftem MicroModal®

This post is also available in German Russian

.CO Berlin Amerika Haus | Charlottenburg | Indoor Shooting | Editorial | Outfit: Closed | Masha Sedgwick with Boyfriend David Jacob

Happiness is the new rich.
Inner peace is the new success.
Health is the new wealth.
Kindness is the new cool.

Friends, SPRING has finally arrived!
How wonderful is that? The first trees in Berlin are blossoming, and the there’s an infectious happy-go-lucky vibe spreading across town. I am dancing on clouds. At long last, it is warm outside, and I enjoy every ray of sunshine I catch. Crazy how a little bit of spring changes the mood, not just for myself, for the whole city it seems.
 
It’s really true, you know, every single year when spring begins I fall in love with Berlin all over again. I am just plain grateful to live in this wonderful city. Right now I’m actually taking that love with me, as I am already on my way to Bangkok when you read these lines!

Another happy place in my life, one that I somehow return to every year. It’s the third time I am going, and my first big trip this year – a nice tradition! Thailand is an amazing country: the food, the people, the colors, I LOVE it! First I’ll spend a few days with Theresa, and then my boyfriend will join, so I’ll get the chance to show them both my favorite places and discover new ones together with them. Not much longer and I’ll finally be ble to eat Pad Thai from street stalls and take colorful, sunny pictures.
Bangkok I AM COMING!

CO Berlin Amerika Haus | Charlottenburg | Indoor Shooting | Editorial | Outfit: Closed | Masha Sedgwick with Boyfriend David Jacob

Learned:
I was at a birthday party on Saturday, and it was beautiful! I barely knew anyone, which I took as an opportunity to make new friends and to break out of my comfort zone. We drank to that, first with a Gin Tonic, then with another, and then with several rounds of shots. I was dead tired that day and told my boyfriend I’d definitely be home before midnight (LOL), but in the heat of the moment I felt a rush of energy and we all agreed that it’d be a great idea to check out another place. We ended up in a mini-club at a lesbian magazine party.
 
By that time I really started to feel that third Gin Tonic though. I was uncharacteristically drunk, to be more blunt, and felt I needed to go home pronto. The next day I had lost my voice, couldn’t stand daylight and just felt terrible in my skin. Pretty tragic considering that the sun shone outside, which I would have loved to be able to enjoy much more. I was still hungover the following day. I guess I have to face it, age is catching up with me. These days I need two days to recover from a proper party night out. Do I regret anything about the evening? No way. I had a great time. The only bad decision was the third Gin Tonic… two would have done the job.

.

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This post is also available in German Russian

Food:
Thanks to a friend of mine, I am gradually turning into a regular at the Israeli restaurant Yafo. The food is delicious (huge amounts of humus, and tons of ingredients I never heard of before), so that’s one big reason to go, but on top of it the place has an amazing living room atmosphere and all-around good vibes. You feel that the staff enjoy working there, the whole setup is super authentic, and not too fancy. Later at night they turn up the music (Israeli pop, of course), and there’s a lot of drinking and dancing on the streets. In other word’s, this is not a regular restaurant, this place invites you to join a culinary (and cultural) adventure!

Exhibition:
Irving Penn at C/O Berlin
The show is a retrospective of Penn’s work with lots of photographs but also newspapers and equipment that illustrate his evolution. It’s a relatively large show, which makes sense considering that Irving Penn’s professional life spanned more than 70 years, in which he built an enormous body of work, especially in the fields of portrait and fashion photography. The exhibition fills two floors, and it’s well worth a visit. This man has helped to shape the historyof photography. How many people can say that about themselves?

Listen:
The State of the Nation (Die Lage der Nation)
I discovered this political podcast presented by a judge and a journalist, and I’m quite into it. On the one hand the subjects are discussed relatively superficially, despite the fact that episodes are relatively long, but you still learn a lot more than you would for example in television news shows. Moreover, the two presenters have very nice voices and it’s a pleasure listening to them present their content authentically and reasonably. If you are interested in politics and daily news (even if you aren’t, actually) give it a listen :)

Happy:
I shot my first set of 7 Youtube videos in a studio, and will start sharing this month! I’m starting with makeup, hair and fashion tutorial, and I’m dying to hear your reactions. I have not seen the final edits myself, but the previews looked fantastic. Can’t wait to take over Youtube! Not an easy mission, I know, but I’m super motivated and really believe that there’s a space for me on that platform..

Shopping:
Yes, I was out shopping again, and it’s been a while. I got myself some great items, also in preparation for the trip to Thailand. I think I may have found some new all-time favorites, especially dresses. I’m so into dresses right now! By the way, I also bought new furniture by Bolia, Made and Ikea, which is arriving piece by piece these days…



CO Berlin Amerika Haus | Charlottenburg | Indoor Shooting | Editorial | Outfit: Closed | Masha Sedgwick with Boyfriend David Jacob

CO Berlin Amerika Haus | Charlottenburg | Indoor Shooting | Editorial | Outfit: Closed | Masha Sedgwick

Thoughts:
Recently I’ve been thinking more and more about y role as influencer. The truth is, I am incredibly grateful to be a ‘genuine’ influencer, someone who has a real reach and the possibility to influence others positively. I know, ‘influencing’ is a tricky word, as it implies manipulation and hidden agendas. But I see myself in a role where I can provide positive stimuli and hopefully some food for though, too. Due to the nature of my job, and the many experiences I get to make, maybe also due to the fact that I am naturally curious and open I hope to ‘influence’ you not only by presenting products, but also by sharing what really moves and interests me. I am aware of the responsibility my reach brings with it, and I feel this conscious approach is often lacking among some of my colleagues with considerably wider reach than mine.
 
I have changed my perspective on quite a few things, and I am curious about a wide range of issues. Seeing these qualities reflected in my circle of friends makes me incredibly proud. I am in the lucky position to be surrounded by exciting, creative minds. I get to be part of a cultural circle that consists not only of fashion people but also of actors, musicians, politicians, scientists and artists – a real potpourri of creativity
The beauty of having friends like that is that there’s always an interesting discussion to be part of, and you get to hear so many different perspectives from informed people, which open up insights into issues that you may not even have had on your radar before. Such talks make me deeply happy. I am aware that I have an influencing effect not only on my followers but also on my friends, who in turn are influencers in their own rights. I have exchanges with journalists, discuss ideas with company founders, talk to musicians and artist and so on and so forth. This gives me an opportunity to leave my cultural and social footprints in this world, to be part of a culture movement that is unfolding in Berlin, here and now, and that consists of people who really want to move things in this world. To be able to perceive myself as part of that group, not only a bystander, is probably the biggest privilege of all in my profession.
 
And the communication really goes both ways. I listen to my followers, and am as influenced by their wishes and thoughts as I in turn influence others by sharing what moves me. It’s a wonderful circle, facilitated by the internet, and a way of open and broad exchange that was inconceivable back in the day when everything was dictated from those above you in the hirarchy. I am grateful to live in this day and age.

What a plot twist you were

This post is also available in German Russian

I need to talk about an issue today that has upset me for quite some time now, and that I’d like to comment on from my perspective.
 
When did influencer bashing become such a huge thing?

 

underwear: Calida

At times it feels like heaping hate on, ridiculing or otherwise targeting influencers has become standard newspaper fare.
 
The last straw was an interview which Caro Daur gave to Manager Magazin, a sign that reviling influencers has spread to all levels of society now. It’s almost like we’re in the middle of a fight, in which only one side is fighting.
 
Please don’t get me wrong!
I think critical questioning is important, as is a certain trust in the media. In my opinion, serious journalists are not only a necessary institution in our society, they also have a bigger responsibility than ever before: the are challenged to educate their readers, they have a mission to shed light on wrongs, to engage objectively and impartially with topics, giving a platform to all the main parties involved. In other words, they are called upon to deal out constructive criticism.
What they don’t have is a mandate to distort issues to produce click-bait as they see fit.
 
Bad journalism is partial, superficially researched and – often enough – incendiary. All for the sake of clicks. Since when is it the job of newspapers and publishers to polarize as much as they can rather than informing the public? I have become more and more aware of this chasm recently the more influencers are present in a wider variety of media.
 
I don’t mean to generalize here, not all articles are bad, some are in fact positive, but I notice more and more writing that I consider genuinely inflammatory.
What goes on in the minds of the people that write these texts?

I read the article in Management Magazin shaking my head in disbelief more than once. Caro did her best to answer every question thoroughly, even the outright condescending ones, but the journalist apparently had nothing better to do than to repeat the same question over and over again, each time only slightly repackaged. The interviewer’s sole questions boiled down to something like this: what is your right to exist and why do you earn so much money with what you do?
 
If you ask a question related to content on Instagram three times in a row and don’t appear willing or capable to understand the question you may not be the right person to conduct the interview. Simple as that. I have never read questions like ‘How do you save money?’ and ‘Do you respect the law?’ in any interview before. They are inappropriate, and I understand completely that Caro chose not to answer them. I don’t know anyone in my wide circle of friends who’d casually share information about how much they earn and what they do with their money.
 
Not least because the answers are often everything but straightforward. On the one hand, influencers do not tend to get a fixed wage. They work independently and self-employed, meaning that the income depends on a fluctuating amount of jobs. The legal framework is still relatively unclear in many respects, since legislation is lagging behind the reality in this fast-changing segment. What I mean to say is this: it’s impossible to generalize here.
But that’s exactly what happened.

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This post is also available in German Russian

Not only in Manager Magazin, also in Zeit, FAZ and a great number of other magazines and newspapers – many of which are actually supposed to be quality papers.
 
I found the articles in FAZ and Zeit to be particularly unsavory, which is why I’d like to respond to the points raised in those two examples here.
 
” rel=”noopener” target=”_blank”>In the Zeit article, two journalists around their thirties accompany Charles Bahr, who has made the round in the media as the youngest agency founder in Germany and Lisa Banholyer, my podcast partner and founder of Blogger Bazaar, who blogs herself and is also active as advisor. Neither Charles nor Lisa are typical influencers, both are wearing many hats – including that of influencer. With that in mind, the article would have been an opportunity to present two genuinely interesting case studies, if the journalists had really engaged with the supposed topic of the article. Unfortunately that’s not what happened.
 
I would have loved to read an impartial, objectively critical piece. The potential would have been there. Instead, research for the article appears superficial at best, and the whole text is characterized by a gross generalization of influencers. Instead of critically assessing the role influencers play in society, i.e. shining a light on and questioning the responsibility influencers have, the text focused only on the role of influencers as advertisers.
 
In particular, the authors of the text appear outright repelled by the young age of many influencers. Sure, it may be unusual for teenagers to found companies and actually earn money with them. But why not? Should that be judged on the sole basis that it doesn’t fit into the standard role narrative? Poking fun at young people for knowing early on what they want to do and having the initiative to fight for that dream is just sad.
 
For example, on the one hand the authors keep pointing out the discrepancy between Charles’ age and his role as entrepreneur. Similarly, Lisa was characterized as good-natured, open woman, who at the same time is calculating and manipulative. All things considered, the article shed an entirely negative light on both influencers, which were open enough to give journalists an insight into their lives. Their daily lives may be unusual, but they showed their lives as they genuinely live them.

But my biggest problem is with the following passage:
 
‘Influencers. The stars of the internet. Role models of the present. They are not famous for a particular talent: influencers don’t sing well, they’re not know for their dancing skills, their not outstanding tennis players. The typical influencer is slim and pretty, that much is true, but they don’t tend to be stratospherically beautiful like the supermodels of the 90s. In fact, narrowing down what influencers did to have reached such fame on the net, particularly among young people, is not at all easy…’
 
To me, this sounds like: influencers have no skills whatsoever.

Ok, this is the moment where I need to take a deep breath. Nothing is more frustrating than someone outright denying your skills. A bit of research really would not have hurt, and it would have been so easy in this case. To get on stage as a 15 year old to present an industry specific subject takes a lot of courage, and a visionary mind in my opinion. I believe that it’s a quality that deserves respect. I invite everybody to ask themselves what they did at 15. It’s a real shame that this perspective was entirely neglected in the article.
 
Without a doubt, there are influencers who pull a fast one and who still have a lot of success. I will openly admit that in some cases I am also wondering how some colleagues became as successful as they are. But if a young person manages to inspire a wide audience there is probably a reason and a certain skill involved, even if I sometimes see the underlying message rather critically.

And there are plenty of influencers out there who are great at what they do. The list of examples is long, including Toni Mahfud who is a great painter, or Christine McConnell, who is a very skilled baker. Both have exceptional talents, but choose to focus on presenting themselves online above all else, which means their other talents may be less obvious. But they are successful, AND have skill.
 
To claim that influencers have no talents is as ridiculous as claiming there are no good journalists out there just because everyone has access to a computer. It’s as absurd as claiming photographers don’t need skills anymore, because the cameras do all the work for them. In every area, some people do better jobs than others, and talent is not distributed evenly. Generalizing all members of an entire profession (on top of it in a completely unfounded way, as both Charles and Lisa do a great job) in the apparent hope to get resonance from a jealous readership is pretty poor form.
 
What’s more, the Instagram users with the widest reach are not usually influencers: football players, singers and actors top the list of accounts with the most followers. The boundary between reach and profession is fluent. One could say that influencers are individuals who are doing a job that is not per se linked to a wide reach, but they somehow managed to have a substantial audience. Both live in a distorted world, both enjoy privileges, if dispensed through different channels. But that doesn’t mean that one group has no right to exist, does it?
 
Talking about football players: what skill do they have? How difficult can it be to kick a ball? *irony off*

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This post is also available in German Russian

In the Die Zeit podcast, one of the journalists reveals that he had difficulties finding influencers that were willing to participate in the experiment. When he was asked why he thought that was, he voiced his assumption that influencers no longer need media outlets like Die Zeit, because they are often famous enough to have to worry about the readership of a newspaper, even a large one. He went on to share that he also had an exchange with Leonie Hahne of Ohh Couture for a period, before she eventually stopped responding.
 
There I was again, shaking my head. No, it’s not that we no longer need large newspapers or publishers – on the contrary! I imagine most of us would have been up for the experiment – but who could be up for being slammed in a partial article?
 
Leonie, a blonde, slim woman in her twenties, who usually presents herself on Instagram in the most beautiful settings of the world, who shows life through a rose-colored filter, knows full well how easy a target she is – PRECISELY because she represents a stereotype. Leonie is not only pretty, she is also pretty smart, and has the brains to strategically work a market to make a living. She provides supply to a huge demand, most of it coming from young women that feel inspired by what they see, and who participate in a dream that Leonie is presenting. My guess is that Leonie got the gist of which slant the article was going to have, that she ultimately considered the journalist to be partial and that she decided to not participate for those reasons.
At any rate, it’s definitely not true that influencers are not interested in print media – on the contrary.


‘Fashion and lifestyle magazines like Couch are the losers, and the successes that influencers enjoy comes at their expense. Magazines face a dilemma: on the one hand influencers ruin their business. Circulations decline, advertising budgets are spent on online marketing. On the other hand the internet stars have become famous to an extent that lifestyle magazines cannot afford to ignore them.’

I wonder if this paragraph essentially mirrors a fear that drives the authors. Magazines like Couch, Instyle or Businesspunk have found a way to enter symbioses with influencers: each party benefits from the reach of the other, both present their content across a wider range of media. Fashion and lifestyle magazines were early adopters and have reacted to the trend much faster than much of their competition. Many of them manage to maintain print as well as online presences that allow them to remain relevant for their target groups. Couch and Instyle are magazines that are still doing very well, even if their respective circulations have declined.
 
The thing is, the fact that print circulations are declining is not due to influencers as much as to the existence of the internet on the whole. It’s true, a growing share of advertising budgets is allocated to online media, and that effect is certainly felt in the print world, especially by daily newspapers. Why wait a day if you can read the news right now, as it happens? The internet is a revolution, influencers are the side effect.

The Zeit article also raised a couple of interesting points, but on the whole I find it rather disappointing. There are so many positive examples out there which could have helped to balance out the picture, like DariaDaria’s work, or Lisa’s political and social activities.
 
It would have been entirely justified to criticize influencers for using so much of their reach for advertising purposes, and so little of it to champion social projects, for example. But this form of criticism did not take place. There is nothing wrong with questioning, and there’s nothing wrong with drawing a negative conclusion. No one is forced to like influencers, be it the concept itself or the work that individual influencers do. But I would have expected a constructive approach and a more balanced picture that shows more than just one perspective. I would have expected the journalists to dig a little deeper.
 
And the article in Die Zeit was not the only text that upset me recently, FAZ published a scathing piece of its own:
The article about Chiara Ferragni’s pregnancy is inflammatory from the beginning to the end. Her motherhood is portrayed as a calculated marketing opportunity. It is implied that her pregnancy is the result of greed and narcissism, and her way of handling social media is harshly criticized. But Chiara only continued to do what she has been doing for years: she documented her daily life, which at some point included her pregnancy. Her feed did not consist merely of perfect pictures, it included the tears of a mother to be.
 
You could call it authentic. Isn’t authenticity the one attribute that is always considered lacking in influencers? When the most famous fashion blogger posts images from her daily life, she lets us peek into a mirror showing her personal reality. Even if her average day is far more glamorous than ours, showing it in a less idealized way also doesn’t seem to silence her critics.


Comments like
 
‘Everything is documented, from tears of exhaustion during child-birth (even then Ferrangi’s flawlessly varnished red fingernails claw their way into the foreground of the picture) to exhausted bliss after the birth, when dad, mini-me and a salad spend their first hours together.’
 
‘With unwavering commitment, when Ferrangi became pregnant, she started alternating posts of risqué lingerie pictures with the perfect natural curve of her belly, in which her little mini-me was growing. One particularly popular motive: the proud dad kissing the baby belly. Not only does he enjoy doing that without a shirt on, it seems he’s up to the task pretty frequently.’
 
‘In truth, the reproductive act, the creation of a little me, is driven by narcissism: both are already capitalizing on their unborn child – after all, it is another fabulous version of themselves.’
 
Leave me speechless.

Dear Johanna Dürrholz, I have a few questions regarding your article:
 
1. Why is it so hard to imagine that a woman in her 30s chooses to have a baby for reasons other than greed for profit?
 
2. Why are pregnant women not allowed to have manicured fingernails? Are they obliged to let themselves go? Should that decision not be left to the women themselves?
 
3. What does an imperfect curve of a pregnant bell look like?
 
4. How many kisses by the father on said pregnant belly to be are allowed?
 
5. When did having children become a narcissistic act?

 
The entire article is so cynical that I feel like leaving it at this point.
The old saying comes to mind:

What Susie says of Sally, says more of Susie than of Sally.

I am genuinely disappointed to read such a text in FAZ. I don’t get annoyed by what passes for articles in Bild (a large German boulevard newspaper) anymore, because I know what to expect (ironically, Bild is actually doing a relatively decent job in their representation of influencers), but I would have expected so much for from papers of the stature of Die Zeit and FAZ, both of which I read and am a subscriber of. I am genuinely disappointed.
 
And just so I make myself clear, it is not my intention to slate the journalism of Die Zeit and FAZ in general. They are both major papers, and the quality of articles necessarily depends on the individual contributors. But in this particular case I would have hoped for a more balanced approach.
 
I am by no means expecting hymns of praise, but I would have loved to see a fair and objective engagement with the subject, one in which not all influencers are lumped together. I’d have loved to read a text that digs deep into the what influencers do. Criticism would have been welcome, if the drive would have been an honest search for answers, with openness for eye-level discussion. For a peaceful coexistence. I am open to that, and I am sure many of my colleagues are as well. Let us start a dialogue!

This post is also available in German Russian

  • In between goals is a thing called life that has
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The Author

Victor & Rolf

Masha Sedgwick ist ein persönlicher Fashion und Style Blog aus Berlin. Neben Mode schreibt die Fashionbloggerin auch häufig über Themegebiete rund um Beauty, Lifestyle und Reisen und gibt wertvolle Tipps, ob zum perfekten Make up, der täglichen Haarpflege, dem besten Hotel oder für den schönsten Städtetrip überall auf der Welt. Der Blog existiert bereits seit 2010 und dank der anspruchsvollen Bilder und persönlichen Texten gehört Masha Sedgwick mittlerweile zu den erfolgreichsten und reichweitestärksten Modeblogs in Deutschland, hat es auch zu internationaler Bekanntheit erreicht und wird regelmäßig im Print und Fernsehen gefeatured.

Masha Sedgwick is a personal fashion and style blog from Berlin. Besides fashion she also writes about beauty, lifestyle and travel and gives valuable tips, whether it's the perfect makeup, daily hair care or the best hotel. Masha Sedgwick runs her blog since 2010 and thanks to its high quality in text and image the blog Masha Sedgwick is now one of the most successful fashion blogs in Germany.

Маша Седжвик – автор личного блога, посвященного моде и стилю. В центре ее внимания не только модная одежда – она часто пишет на темы, связанные с красотой, образом жизни и путешествиями, освещает модные тенденции, а также дает ценные советы – например, как сделать идеальный макияж, как правильно ухаживать за волосами, как выбрать отель или куда поехать в отпуск. Блог Маши Седжвик существует с 2010 года. Благодаря интересным текстам и качественным фотографиям он стал одним из самых успешных блогов о моде в Германии и постепенно приобретает популярность за ее пределами.

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